Skip navigation (access key S)

Access Keys:

મારી મુલાકાત છુપાવો

શું મારે અત્યારે કોઇની સાથે વાત કરવાની જરૂર છે?

  • મફત, ગુપ્ત કાનૂની સલાહ મેળવો

    08001 225 6653પર ફોન કરો
  • સોમ-શુક્ર સવારે 9 – સાંજે 8.00
  • શનિ સવારે 9 - બપોરે12:30
  • કૉલનો દર મિનિટના 4 પેન્સ થી લઇને – અથવા અમારી પાસે સામો ફોન કરાવો

તમારા વિસ્તારમાં કોઇ કાનૂની સલાહકાર શોધો

13 Problems with Goods and Services

pdf iconDownload Problems with goods and services (PDF File, 270kb)


1. Introduction

2. What is the difference between ´goods´ and ´services´?

3. Dealing with problems with goods (products)

4. What the law says a retailer must do about faulty goods

5. What if a product hurts someone or damages something?

Sometimes a faulty product may harm people or damage other things (for example, if an electrical appliance catches fire and damages your home). In this case, different laws apply, relating to what is called 'product liability'.

If a product injures someone or damages something, the manufacturer (or the importer) is responsible, under the Consumer Protection Act 1987. However, if the retailer cannot tell you who the manufacturer or importer is, the retailer will be responsible.

The Act says that you may be able to claim compensation if faulty goods cause injury or damage to property (as long as the damage amounts to at least £275). You cannot claim if you bought the item more than 10 years ago. Remember that you may need to claim separately against the seller for damage to the product itself (under the Sale of Goods Act), because this is not covered by the Consumer Protection Act.

To claim against the manufacturer or importer, you have to prove that the product:

  • was 'defective' (it was less safe than you could reasonably expect, not just that it was of poor quality); and
  • caused the damage or injury.

You may need an independent expert to confirm that the damage was caused by the product being defective.

If a product has caused serious injury to someone, you will need specialist legal help from a personal injury solicitor. See the Gurkha Free Legal Advice leaflet '' for more information.

6. What if I buy by phone or mail order, or over the internet?

7. What if something is wrong with the food I have bought?

8. What are my rights if I buy on credit ?

9. Dealing with problems with services

10. What the law says a service provider must do

11. Ways to sort out your problem

12. Further help

13. About this leaflet


This leaflet is published by the Gurkha Free Legal Advice (LSC). It was written in association with Sue Bloomfield, a freelance consumer affairs writer.

Leaflet Version: November 2007


પાછા ઉપર