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eleafletIs residential care right for me?

You may be considering moving into residential care because:

  • you are struggling to cope at home,
  • your needs have changed, or
  • your partner or carer may not be able to provide as much help as they once did.

It's important to be sure that a move into a care home is right for you. In most cases, older people do not need permanent care in a care home. Maybe more or different care at home could meet your needs. Or a move to sheltered housing may be an option. For more about your housing options, see the Housing Choices pages of the website of charity AgeUK (a new organisation formed by AgeConcern and Help the Aged).

To help you decide, you should visit several suitable homes. AgeUK produces a checklist of what to look for in a home. You or your local council can also try to arrange for you to stay in a home for a short time as a trial period.

You can find out more here about the kind of residential care that is available; what you may have to pay; and what your rights are.

Who decides whether I need residential care?

Choosing to go into a home should be your decision. Your local council can help you make that choice.


What kind of care can I get?

Care homes provide somewhere to live, your meals and personal care. They can bring in healthcare from the NHS if you need it. And some care homes also provide nursing care themselves.


What if I just need care for a short time?

You may only need to go into residential care for a few weeks or months. If you do, you may be entitled to temporary 'intermediate care', which is free. Otherwise, you may have to pay.


What if I want to stay in my own home?

You have the right to say you don't want to move into a care home, even if your local council thinks it would be best for you and most cost-effective for them. But if you choose to stay in your own home, you may not get all the help you need and may have to challenge the council.


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