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2. My creditors keep calling me. What can I do?

People you owe money to are called creditors. Both creditors and collection agents use letters and telephone calls as an alternative to court action to recover debts. Most creditors have limited powers to recover a debt unless court action has been taken against you and you have not paid as ordered by the court. Some creditors may mention that they can make you bankrupt for debts of £750 or over. It is very rare for a creditor to take this action.

If you receive telephone calls from your creditors, it is important to explain that you are having financial difficulties and how you hope to resolve the situation. If you have done this and you are still receiving persistent calls from your creditors or their collectors, this may count as harassment.

Creditors should not put undue pressure on you to pay more than you can afford. Office of Fair Trading guidelines state that, for example, creditors should not:

  • contact you by telephone too frequently;
  • pressure you into selling any of your property or assets; or
  • pressure you into taking on further debt to repay existing debts.

If your creditor isn’t following these guidelines you should keep a note of calls from them including the date and time as well as the name of the person you are speaking to. You should also keep a copy of all letters. This information can then be used to complain to the Office of Fair Trading or your local Trading Standards Office.

If you need help dealing with your creditors, or any other aspect of debt, we recommend that you speak to one of our debt advisers on 08001 225 6653 for specialist advice. Telephone specialist advice is only available if you qualify for legal aid.

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