Skip navigation (access key S)

Access Keys:

Hide my visit

Need to speak to somebody now?

  • Get free, confidential legal advice

    Call 08001 225 6653
  • Mon - Fri  9am - 8:00pm
  • Sat  9am - 12:30pm
  • Calls from 4p/min - or get us to call you back
  • CHRISTMAS 2010: We are closed on the 25th, 27th and 28th December and the 1st and 3rd January. On 24th and 31st December we will close at 6:30pm rather than the usual 8pm.

Find a legal adviser in your area

What are my rights if I'm made redundant?

See All Advice Tools See All Advice Tools

Redundancy is a fair form of dismissal. It occurs when an employer decides they need fewer people in the business.

In practice, redundancy happens in one of the following situations:

  • A business is closing
  • A workplace is closing - a specific branch of the business is shutting down
  • There is less need for the employees to do a particular type of work in the organisation.

Your employer must follow a fair procedure and allow you to appeal.

Did your employer follow a fair procedure and allow you to appeal?

Your employer has a duty to consult with you about your redundancy.

Are 20 or more people being made redundant?

Your employer has a duty to consult with you individually.

The consultation should start when the employer becomes aware that redundancy may become necessary. The purpose of the consultation is to explore ways of:

  • avoiding the redundancy
  • reducing the number of employees to be dismissed
  • making the consequences of dismissal less severe.

Your employer should write to you and tell you that you are at risk of redundancy. They should invite you to a meeting to discuss the criteria for redundancy and whether or not you meet them; and offer you the right to appeal. They should also tell you:

  • the reasons for the proposed redundancy
  • the number and type of employees likely to be made redundant
  • how they will choose people for redundancy
  • the procedure they will follow
  • about redundancy payment.

Have these procedures been followed?

Have you worked for your employer for two years or more?

back to top